Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) Integrates SMS Into Messenger

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Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) has successfully integrated SMS into its Messenger app meaning users can now receive their SMS messages through Messenger.

The company announced that the new development makes it possible for Alphabet Inc (NASDAQ:GOOGL) Android phones to use Messenger for their SMS communication thanks to the integration. The social network company claims that users can now use Messenger as their default messaging app. The Messenger app is now more likely to become more popular. One of the company’s goals is to eliminate the need for phone numbers and the recent announcement means the firm is closer to that goal.

Facebook launched the feature and made it optional meaning users can decide whether or not to activate it. Those who wish to do so can visit the Messenger app settings where the option exists to set Messenger as the default messaging app. Once this feature is selected, the user’s SMS messages will be diverted to the Messenger app. SMS conversations will appear purple. The company also made it clear that the messages will not be stored on its servers. Additionally, the SMS messages will still incur the regular charges from service providers.

Facebook also revealed that the feature is currently available only to Android users and has not been extended to iPhones due to iOS limitations. However, Apple has also included numerous other features to its messaging app which now features stickers and new imojis so iPhone owners are not missing out on everything. The new feature will be available to users in select countries starting next week. The integration has led to numerous questions such as how SMS will benefit from bots that the company has been working on adding to Messenger to make it more rounded.

Facebook’s plans are to eventually encourage users to use Messenger for their messaging needs because it offers its service at a much cheaper cost for data compared to the amount charged by mobile service providers.

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