Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) Finds Symbolic Victory Over Samsung

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Only days after Samsung Electronics requested the US Supreme Court to take up its patent conflict with Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL), Samsung has been ordered not to sell some of its older smartphones in the United States.

On Monday, US district Judge Lucy Koh granted an Apple motion for an injunction against all devices that are covered by the patents that Samsung was found to be overstepping. The Galaxy S2 Skyrocket , Admire, Galaxy Note 2, Galaxy Nexus, Galaxy Note, Galaxy S2 Epic 4G Touch and several other devices that are now banned from sale in the US. All the banned smartphone devices are at least three years old.

Samsung is said to have violated some patents including slide to unlock, autocorrect and data collection, all owned by Apple. During the hearing, the court declared that it found that Apple will suffer irredeemable harm if Samsung was allowed to continue selling the infringed features. Monetary compensation alone was deemed unsatisfactory. However, Joe Mullins at Ars Technica believes that since the phones are quite old the order won’t shake Samsung’s market share significantly.

The court order also banned any Samsung software or code that might implement an infringing feature in the future. The order came as a surprise as Judge Koh is the one who ruled in August 2014 that the $199.6 million compensation Apple got from Samsung was adequate and satisfactory. If the court could not ban the devices then, why did it order the ban now? That’s why the injunction may only be a temporary symbolic victory until the case is decided.

A Samsung spokesman called the order another example of the abuse of the judicial system by Apple. According to Samsung, the order creates a bad legal precedent and has the potential to harm the choice of consumers for several generations to come. Samsung is warning that every other tech company is now concerned that the Apple versus Samsung conflict will be a gateway for more patent litigation.

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